What is OFRD?

Organization of Fast Relief & Development (OFRD) is an independent, humanitarian non-governmental organization working to help and rebuild Afghanistan after decades of war and destruction. OFRD is a registered NGO with “NGO’s Department” of Economy of Government of Afghanistan.  Our program activities are concentrated on six core activities as following:

  • Strategic Partnership on Lobby & Advocacy (SPLA)
  • Combating Trafficking in Persons (CTIP)
  • Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP)
  • Afghanistan Elections Program (AEP)
  • Community Policing Program (CPP)
  • Women/Youth & Sports Program (WSP)
  • Returnees/IDPs & Livelihood (RIL)

 

Our Activities:

 

  •  Strategic Partnership on lobby & Advocacy

Afghanistan has come a long way since 2001 and has made much progress under extremely challenging circumstances. The mining sector in Afghanistan has the potential to generate major government revenue for the country and is recognized as a valuable source of revenue to develop the national economy. The security background means that the central government is hampered in its ability to manage and enforce revenue collection in accordance with its laws. Building on earlier efforts, President Ashraf Ghani announced reforms specific to the extractive sector as part of a wider anti-corruption package in May 2016.

Afghanistan has been suffering almost 30 years of war, conflict, and domestic violence. This destroyed badly the mining system and an environment of cooperation between government and community people. A recent World Bank report highlighted that poverty in Afghanistan increased, and 39% of the Afghan population lives below the national poverty line,(Afghanistan is a country of rich mining). The role of community people was ignored in the mining sector.

At OFRD we realize that the conservative nature of Afghan society requires innovative approaches to ensure that Afghan people are not left out of decision-making process of mining in their own communities. OFRD works to respond to such challenges, whilst working closely with Ministry of Mines and Petroleum (MoMP), Deputy Ministry of Youth Affairs (DMoYA), Ministry of Women Affair (MoWA), Afghanistan media organizations, Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG) and CSOs.

  • Combating Trafficking in Persons (CTIP)

Afghanistan is a source, transit, and destination country for men, women, and children subjected to forced labor and sex trafficking. The Government of Afghanistan does not fully comply with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking; however, it is making significant efforts to do so. Afghanistan’s global position on human trafficking has been inconsistent largely due to low priority among both national and international stakeholder and perhaps security-related challenges to reach out to vulnerable populations at grassroots and prosecute perpetrators by national and provincial justice systems. The tier rating by the U.S. State Department in its global TIP report placed Afghanistan into tier – 2 (watch list) in 2019. The national performance seemed to be improving in 2014 and 2015 but again Afghanistan downgraded into tier – 2 (watch list) in a 2016 report released in June 2016. For the first time in Afghanistan, OFRD marked an international day to fight against Trafficking in Persons (TIP) on July 30, 2016, and consequently for the second time in 2017, and third time in 2018.

 

  • Humanitarian Assistance Program (HAP)

The OFRD’s aim is to help and assist communities prepared for disasters and to minimize the impact when disasters are occurring. Preparedness is a continuous cycle of planning, organizing, training, equipping, exercising, evaluation and improvement activities to ensure effective coordination and the enhancement of capabilities to prevent, protect against, respond to, and mitigate the effects of natural disasters and other man-made disasters. OFRD responses focus on families’ evacuation and then providing food and basic non-food relief items. Relief supplies kit may be prepared and for sheltering purposes, a stockpile of supplies may be created. These kits may include food, water, medicine, and money. OFRD help affected communities in shelters and disaster recovery stage, in its all relief operation, OFRD’s major goal is to move as quickly as possible from disaster response to rehabilitation and reconstruction process of communities and then to sustained development. OFRD help the Returnees and IDPs for the basic living needs and rebuild livelihoods.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Afghanistan Elections Program (AEP)

Afghanistan has held five national elections since the fall of the Taliban. Unfortunately, each electoral process has revealed significant flaws in the country’s democratic framework. Both the 2010 parliamentary election and 2014 presidential election were marred by widespread fraud and tarnished the legitimacy of Afghanistan’s electoral management institutions. Large numbers of irregularities and resistance to the adjudication process called into question the legitimacy of the elections and reinforced widely held perceptions of corruption and lack of accountability. OFRD has been a leading organization in providing public awareness on elections to the Afghan people since 2012, and OFRD will be observing elections from 2019 at national and international level.

 

  • Community Policing Program (CPP)

OFRD has been working in the area of Community Policing known as Police-e-Mardumi (Police with the people) to undertake decentralized activities to build effective police-community partnerships for effective service delivery, accountability and ensuring security based on democratic policing principles. The movement toward community policing has gained momentum in recent years as police and community people search for more effective ways to promote public safety and to enhance the quality of life in their communities. Community policing strategies vary depending on the needs and responses of the communities involved; however, certain basic principles and considerations are common to all community policing efforts. Community policing consists of two core components, community partnership and problem-solving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Women/Youth & Sports Program (WSP)

There has been significant international investment to support Afghan women, including efforts to strengthen women’s rights. Since 2001 the gains in women’s rights have been lauded as one of the most tangible benefits from the international community´s engagement with Afghanistan. Afghan women, with assistance from the international community, have fought for and achieved a number of rights. “Youth are a most valuable asset, for today’s youth will be tomorrow’s leaders and human resource”. OFRD has been actively working in the area of women/youth and sports since last 5 years. Sport plays a primarily positive role in youth development, including improved academic achievement, higher self-esteem, fewer behavioral problems, and better psychosocial. Many studies focus on the effects of sport on the five “C’s”—competence, confidence, connections, character, and caring—which are considered critical components of positive youth development. At OFRD, we use sports, for peace, development and building trust between police and people.

 

  • Returnees/IDPs & Livelihood (RIL)

Roughly one-third of Afghanistan’s GDP is attributed to agricultural activity, with the illicit commercial production of poppy equivalent to between 7 and 12% of GDP. Afghanistan’s service sector has grown, but the economy remains characterized by small-scale export of goods, endemic poverty, and high unemployment. It remains one of the poorest countries in the world, with a poverty rate of 36%. OFRD is working in Afghanistan to find sources of income, job creations and overall economic development through agriculture, poultry, fish farming, dairy and Small and Medium Enterprise (SMEs). RIL is mainly working for the reintegration of returnees and IDPs to their community development, livelihood, counseling, research, capacity building, and economic development opportunities.